Die Wechselwirkung von Trauma und akzidenteller Hypothermie

Dieser spannende Artikel von Brodmann M et al. diskutiert die gefährliche Wechselwirkung von Trauma und akzidenteller Hypothermie.

Abstract

Nonfreezing cold injury (NFCI) is a modern term for trench foot or immersion foot. Moisture is required to produce a NFCI. NFCI seldom, if ever, results in loss of tissue unless there is also pressure necrosis or infection. Much of the published material regarding management of NFCIs has been erroneously borrowed from the literature on warm water immersion injuries. NFCI is a clinical diagnosis. Most patients with NFCI have a history of losing feeling for at least 30 min and having pain or abnormal sensation on rewarming. Limbs with NFCI usually pass through four 'stages.' cold exposure, post-exposure (prehyperaemic), hyperaemic, and posthyperaemic. Limbs with NFCI should be cooled gradually and kept cool. Amitriptyline is likely the most effective medication for pain relief. If prolonged exposure to wet, cold conditions cannot be avoided, the most effective measures to prevent NFCI are to stay active, wear adequate clothing, stay well-nourished, and change into dry socks at least daily.

>> Vollständiger Beitrag "Hypothermia in Trauma" auf MDPI.COM

 

Weitere Informationen

Alle Artikel der IJERPH Special Issue on Accidental and Environmental Hypothermia zur Prognostizierung des Outcomes von Patienten im hypothermen Herzstillstand

Alle Beiträge zum Thema Hypothermie

Autor(en): Prim. PD Dr. med. Peter Paal MBA EDAIC EDIC

Kategorie: Blog, Alpine Notfallmedizin, Hypothermie

Datum: 13. Mär 2022

You May Also Like

Long-Term Sequelae of Frostbite

Zwei Artikel beschäftigten sich mit lokalen Kälteschäden, der erste mit nicht lokalen Nicht-Erfrierungsschäden. Im zweiten Artikel berichten Regli I et al. von Langzeitschäden nach Erfrierungsschäden.

weiter

24. Mär 2022
Blog
Alpine Notfallmedizin
Hypothermie

Nonfreezing Cold Injury (Trench Foot)

Zwei Artikel beschäftigten sich mit lokalen Kälteschäden, der erste mit nicht lokalen Nicht-Erfrierungsschäden. Im zweiten Artikel berichten Regli I et al. von Langzeitschäden nach Erfrierungsschäden.

weiter

21. Mär 2022
Blog
Alpine Notfallmedizin
Hypothermie

Kontakt

Österreichische Gesellschaft für Alpin- und Höhenmedizin
Katrin & Mag. Reinhard Pühringer
Lehnrain 30a
A - 6414 Mieming 
Katrin:     +43 664 4368247
Reinhard: +43 664 3061971

email

Volltextsuche

ÖGAHM - Österreichische Gesellschaft für Alpin- und Höhenmedizin

powered by webEdition CMS